This is interesting.

So I’m on my laptop wasting time between classes and I decided to check my DS account.

DiaperSpace and DailyDiapers is blocked on the college’s network. It was classified as pornography/nudity.

WTF is up with that?

Just thought it was kind of interesting that websites are blocked on their network.

I swear last semester I was able to get on DS from both my laptop and one of the school’s computers.

Re: This is interesting.

Last I checked, DS was an adult site. Still, I’ve seen instances where schools are very lax about blocking things.

Re: This is interesting.

Use a proxy….

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At a college? that’s a bad idea. Most colleges have an IT policy allowing them to block you from using their network for that.

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Not a proxy site filter, a full fledge proxy. Big difference.

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I never said I didn’t think they shouldn’t be classified as such, I just said it was interesting that they are blocked. I remember last semester I was able to get on DS just fine from a computer in the library.

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I know what you meant, and what I said still stands. Using a proxy to bypass the school’s filters (which usually won’t work anyway I might add unless their IT department is staffed by idiots) is usually forbidden by the AUP students are required to sign before they can use the campus network.

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….College tech departments aren’t full of idiots? When did this happen?

And furthermore….how would you catch someone using a proper proxy? Wouldn’t that defeat the point of the proxy’s existence?

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Very simple: Unless the connection between the browser and proxy is encrypted, you can identify it simply by decoding the packets to look at the headers. A proper proxy includes a Via: header to identify the source of the request, but even an improper one has to have a properly formed GET line that includes the full website address.

Now if you want to go with a SOCKS proxy, you just have to inspect the packets themselves, no need to decode them.

Oh, and since I forgot to comment on this twice now. A lot of colleges are starting to implement filters on their networks to block sites like those for reasons that can vary from monetary (as in, if you don’t you lose funding) to just being jackasses (like the vo-tech I went to who only blocked sites because they could)

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A lot of colleges are starting to implement filters on their networks to block sites like those for reasons that can vary from monetary (as in, if you don’t you lose funding) to just being jackasses (like the vo-tech I went to who only blocked sites because they could)

Translation? I have no idea what the hell you just said…

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Blocking access to sites like diaperspace on their campus and library networks is usually either to ensure the continue to get outside funding they need or just so they can force their own beliefs onto students. It’s rarely because anyone with the ability to make the decisions to block or not actually cares about the content of the blocked sites.

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Ah, nvm. I misread part of your sentence as the parenthesis threw me off for a moment….

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We have no blocking of anything =D

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It’s not so much that the schools proxy server or Firewall was probably set to block those sites only, but that the “systems” we shall say are designed around a keyword. Just like where I work, if I were to goto google, or Bing or what ever and try and do a search on “games” then it would block the search because it dealt with games. Alot of times these systems are smart systems that once you goto the site, it picks up on that traffic, scans the headers as Joey said (translation, it scans the information sent between your computer and the remote server ((website)) and adds it to the list of bad sites. Once you try to go back, poof…it’s gone. We have a headache with this all the time as our bluecoat proxy/firewall learns and at times it blocks sites that are harmless. So we have to go back in and manually open up these sites. Keep in mind though….most proxy servers only scan for words in your native language. If you want to bypass a proxy sometimes its as easy as typing in what you are looking for in a foreign language, or using google cache (history of a site).
I can tell you one thing, it’s always fun for me when the proxy server goes down as our network traffic goes up considerably when people realize they can get to sites that were blocked moments earlier. Luckily, most people don’t ever know it unless they just happen to try. Otherwise, they just figure it’s still blocked.

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My college doesn’t seem to block anything. At least, nothing I’ve come across yet.